6 CRR-NY 228-1.2NY-CRR

OFFICIAL COMPILATION OF CODES, RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK
TITLE 6. DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION
CHAPTER III. AIR RESOURCES
SUBCHAPTER A. PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF AIR CONTAMINATION AND AIR POLLUTION
PART 228. SURFACE COATING PROCESSES, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL ADHESIVES, SEALANTS AND PRIMERS
SUBPART 228-1. SURFACE COATING PROCESSES
6 CRR-NY 228-1.2
6 CRR-NY 228-1.2
228-1.2 Definitions.
(a) To the extent that they do not conflict with the specific definitions in Subdivision (b) of this section, the general definitions of Part 200 of this Title apply.
(b) For the purposes of this Subpart, the following specific definitions apply:
(1) Aerospace coating. A material applied to an aerospace vehicle or component to form a decorative, protective, functional solid film or the solid film itself.
(2) Adhesion prime. A coating that is applied to a polyolefin part to promote the adhesion of a subsequent coating. An adhesion prime is clearly identified as an adhesion prime or adhesion promoter on its accompanying material safety data sheet.
(3) Air-dried. A coating that is cured at a temperature below 90°C (194°F).
(4) Adhesive. An adhesive, including glass bonding adhesive, used at an automobile or light-duty truck assembly coating facility, applied for the purpose of bonding two vehicle surfaces together without regard to the substrates involved.
(5) Airless spray. A spray coating method in which the coating is atomized by forcing it through a small nozzle opening at high pressure and which is not mixed with air before exiting from the nozzle opening.
(6) Antifoulant coating. Any coating registered with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a pesticide under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (7 United States Code section 136) and applied to the underwater portion of a marine pleasure craft to prevent or reduce the attachment of biological organisms.
(7) Appropriate emission control measures. Actions taken to prevent a coating lines operation from emitting air contaminants to the outdoor atmosphere of such quantity, characteristic or duration which are injurious to human, plant or animal life or to property, or which unreasonably interfere with the comfortable enjoyment of life or property. The actions taken may consist of mechanical measures (including but not limited to enclosures, exhaust stacks and filters) or operational procedures (including but not limited to controlling the work area, limiting the coating operations size and duration); or a combination of mechanical and operational measures.
(8) Automotive elastomeric coating. A coating designed for application over flexible mobile equipment surfaces and mobile equipment components, such as elastomeric bumpers.
(9) Automotive jambing clearcoat. A fast-drying, ready-to-spray clearcoat applied to surfaces such as door jambs and trunk and hood edges to allow for quick closure.
(10) Automotive lacquer. A thermoplastic coating applied directly to bare metal of mobile equipment surfaces and mobile equipment components which dries primarily by VOC solvent evaporation, and is re-soluble in its original VOC solvent.
(11) Automotive low-gloss coating. A coating which exhibits a gloss reading less than or equal to 25 on a 60 degree gloss-meter.
(12) Automotive multi-colored topcoat. A topcoat that exhibits more than one color, is packaged in a single container, and camouflages surface defects on areas of heavy use, such as cargo beds and other surfaces of trucks and other utility vehicles.
(13) Automotive pretreatment primer. A primer that contains a minimum of 0.5 percent acid, by weight, that is applied directly to bare metal surfaces of mobile equipment surfaces and mobile equipment components to provide corrosion resistance and to promote adhesion of subsequent coatings.
(14) Automotive primer-sealer. A coating applied to mobile equipment and mobile equipment components prior to the application of a topcoat for the purpose of providing corrosion resistance, promoting adhesion of subsequent coatings, promoting color uniformity, and promoting the ability of the undercoat to resist penetration by the topcoat.
(15) Automotive primer surfacer. A coating applied to mobile equipment and mobile equipment components prior to the application of topcoat for the purpose of filling surface imperfections in the substrate, providing corrosion resistance, or promoting adhesion of subsequent coatings.
(16) Automotive specialty coatings. Coatings including but not limited to: elastomeric coatings, adhesion promoters, low-gloss coatings, bright metal trim repair coatings, jambing clearcoats, impact resistant coatings, rubberized asphaltic underbody coatings, uniform finish blenders, and weld through primers applied to automotive surfaces; and automotive lacquer topcoats applied to a classic motor vehicle or motor vehicle components.
(17) Automotive topcoat. A coating or series of coatings applied over an automotive primer surfacer, automotive primer-sealer or existing finish on mobile equipment and mobile equipment components for the purpose of protection and/or beautification.
(18) Automotive touch-up repair. The application of automotive topcoat finish materials to cover minor finishing imperfections no greater than one inch in diameter.
(19) Baked coating. A coating that is cured at a temperature at or above 90°C (194°F).
(20) Bedliner. A multi-component coating, applied to a cargo bed after the application of a topcoat to provide additional durability and chip resistance.
(21) Black coating. A coating which meets both of the following criteria:
(i) Maximum lightness: 23 units.
(ii) Saturation: less than 2.8, where saturation equals the square root of A² + B².
These criteria are based on Cielab color space, 0/45 geometry. For spherical geometry, specular included, maximum lightness is 33 units.
(22) Building enclosure. A building, housing a process that meets the requirements of a temporary total enclosure. Method 204E of 40 CFR part 51, appendix M, must be used to identify all emission points from the building enclosure and to determine which emission points must be tested as set forth in the EPA guidance document entitled ‘Guidelines for Determining Capture Efficiency’ (see table 1, section 200.9 of this Title).
(23) Business machine. A device that uses electronic or mechanical methods to process information, perform calculations, print or copy information or convert sound into electrical impulses for transmission, including devices listed in Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) numbers 3572, 3573, 3574, 3579, and 3661 as well as photocopy machines, which is a subcategory of SIC number 3861 (see table 1, section 200.9 of this Title).
(24) Camouflage coating. A coating used, principally by the military, to conceal equipment from detection.
(25) Capture efficiency (CE). The fraction of all VOC vapors generated by a coating line that is directed to a control device.
(26) Capture system. All the equipment including, but not limited to: hoods, ducts, fans, booths, ovens, or dryers that contain, collect, and transport an air pollutant to a control device.
(27) Certification. Documentation furnished for coatings and adhesives as applied using EPA Method 311 or 24 as presented in Appendices A of both 40 CFR parts 63 and 60, respectively (see table 1, section 200.9 of this Title), manufacturer’s formulation data, or an alternative method approved by the administrator and the department. If there are any inconsistencies between the results of an EPA reference method test and any other means of determining the VOC content of a coating, then the results of an EPA reference method test will govern.
(28) Classic motor vehicle. A motor vehicle that is more than 25 years old; or a motor vehicle which the Commissioner of the New York State Department of Motor Vehicle determines, has historical, classical or exhibition value, qualifying it for a historical registration pursuant to 15 NYCRR Part 23.
(29) Cavity wax. A coating applied into the cavities of automobiles or light-duty trucks and motor vehicles primarily for the purpose of enhancing corrosion protection.
(30) Clear coating. A coating which lacks color and opacity or is transparent and uses the undercoat as a reflectant base.
(31) Clear topcoat. A final coating which contains binders but not opaque pigments and which is specifically formulated to form a transparent or translucent solid protective film on wood furniture.
(32) Clear wood finish. A clear and semi-transparent topcoat applied to wood substrates of a pleasure craft to provide a transparent or translucent film.
(33) Coating category. Identifies a particular coating type based on its intended purpose within a coating line or the coating of a product; such as topcoats, clear coats, sealers, adhesives etc.
(34) Coating or surface coating. A material applied onto or impregnated into a substrate for protective, decorative, or functional purposes. Such materials include, but are not limited to: paints, varnishes, primers, sealers, adhesives, inks and maskants.
(35) Coating line. The application of one or more surface coatings, using one or more applicators, together with any associated drying or curing areas. A single coating line ends after drying or curing and before other surface coatings are applied. For any web coating line this term means an entire coating application system, including any associated drying ovens or areas located between an unwind station and rewind station, that is used to apply surface coatings onto a continuous strip or web.
(36) Coating system. A means of complying with VOC emission requirements by use of one or more surface coatings applied sequentially at the same coating line; which may also include the use of other control equipment.
(37) Coating process. One or more coating lines and includes any methods of controlling VOC emissions and any operations in between coating lines.
(38) Color-matched coating. A coating which is applied over a manufacturer’s coating in order to, but not limited to, match colors, add designs or logos to mobile equipment and/or mobile equipment components of a company’s mobile vehicle fleet.
(39) Container. Any portable device in which a material is stored, transported, or otherwise handled.
(40) Curtain coating. The application of a coating to an object by moving the object through a falling curtain of coating.
(41) Data quality objective approach. A set of approval criteria that must be met so that data from an alternative test method can be used in determining the Capture Efficiency (CE) of a control system as set forth in the EPA guidance document entitled ‘Guidelines for Determining Capture Efficiency’ (see table 1, section 200.9 of this Title).
(42) Deadener. A coating, used on automobile, light duty trucks or motor vehicles, applied to selected vehicle surfaces primarily for the purpose of reducing the sound of road noise in the passenger compartment.
(43) Dip coating. The application of a coating by immersing an object into the coating.
(44) Drum. Any cylindrical metal shipping container that is larger than 12 gallons capacity but no larger than 110 gallons capacity.
(45) Electric dissipating coating. A coating that rapidly dissipates a high voltage electric charge.
(46) Electric-insulating varnish. A non-convertible-type coating applied to electric motors, components of electric motors, or power transformers, to provide electrical, mechanical, and environmental protection or resistance.
(47) Electro deposition primer. A process of applying a protective, corrosion-resistant primer on exterior and interior surfaces that provides thorough coverage of recessed areas. It is a dip coating method that uses an electrical field to apply or deposit the conductive coating onto the part. The object being painted acts as an electrode that is oppositely charged from the particles of paint in the dip tank; also referred to as E-Coat, Uni-Prime, and ELPO Primer.
(48) Electrostatic prep coat. A coating that is applied to a plastic part solely to provide conductivity for the subsequent application of a prime, a topcoat, or other coating through the use of electrostatic application methods. An electrostatic prep coat shall be clearly identified as an electrostatic prep coat on its accompanying material safety data sheet.
(49) EMI/RFI shielding. A coating used on electrical or electronic equipment to provide shielding against electromagnetic interference, radio frequency interference, or static discharge.
(50) Etching filler. Is a coating that contains less than 23 percent solids by weight and at least 1/2-percent acid by weight, and is used instead of applying a pretreatment coating followed by a primer.
(51) Excluded compounds. Any of the compounds expressly excluded from the definition of volatile organic compounds in section 200.1 of this Title.
(52) Exterior siding. This is flat wood paneling which may be made of solid wood, hardboard, or wafer board. Siding made of solid wood and hardboard is typically primed at the manufacturing facility and finished in the field, although some finishing may be performed during manufacturing on a limited basis.
(53) Extreme high-gloss coating. Is defined based on specific coating processes as follows:
(i) for “miscellaneous metal parts, miscellaneous plastic parts, large appliance, and metal furniture,” a coating which shows at least 75 percent reflectance on a 60° meter; or
(ii) for “pleasure craft surface coatings”, a coating which shows at least 95 percent reflectance on a 60° meter.
(54) Extreme-performance coating. A coating used on a metal or plastic surface formulated for and exposed to harsh environmental conditions, including but not limited to:
(i) chronic exposure to corrosive, caustic or acidic agents, chemicals, chemical fumes, chemical mixtures or solutions; or
(ii) repeated exposure to temperatures in excess of 121°C (250°F); or
(iii) repeated heavy abrasion, including mechanical wear and repeated scrubbing with industrial grade solvents, cleansers or scouring agents. Extreme performance coatings include, but are not limited to, coatings applied to locomotives, railroad cars, farm machinery, and heavy duty trucks.
(55) Final repair (automobile and light-duty truck assembly). The operations performed and coating(s) applied to completely assembled motor vehicles or to parts that are not yet on a completely assembled vehicle to correct damage or imperfections in the coating. The curing of the coatings applied in these operations is accomplished at a lower temperature than that used for curing primer-surfacer and topcoat.
(56) Finish primer/surface. A coating applied with a wet film thickness of less than 10 millimeters prior to the application of a topcoat for purposes of providing corrosion resistance, adhesion of subsequent coatings, a moisture barrier, or promotion of a uniform surface necessary for filling in surface imperfections.
(57) Flexible coating. Any coating that is required to comply with engineering specifications for impact resistance, mandrel bend, or elongation as defined by the original equipment manufacturer.
(58) Flow coating. The application of a coating by flowing the coating over an object and completely covering the surface.
(59) Fog coat. A coating that is applied to a plastic part for the purpose of color matching without masking a molded-in texture. A fog coat shall not be applied at a thickness of more than 0.5 millimeters of coating solids.
(60) Gasket/gasket sealing material. Is defined based on specific coating processes as follows:
(i) For “automobile or light-duty truck assembly gasket/gasket sealing material”, a fluid, used at a coating facility, applied to coat a gasket or replace and perform the same function as a gasket. Automobile and light-duty truck gasket/gasket sealing material includes room temperature vulcanization (RTV) seal material.
(ii) For “motor vehicle gasket/gasket sealing material”, a fluid, used at a facility that is not an automobile or light-duty truck assembly coating facility, applied to coat a gasket or replace and perform the same function as a gasket.
(61) General, multi-component coating. A coating requiring the addition of a separate reactive resin, commonly known as a catalyst or hardener, before application to form an acceptable dry film. It applies to any coating used in a specified coating line which is not otherwise identified by another coating category.
(62) General, one-component coating. A coating that is ready for application as it comes out of its container to form an acceptable dry film. A thinner, necessary to reduce the viscosity, is not considered a component. It applies to any coating used in a specified coating line which is not otherwise identified by another coating category.
(63) Glass bonding primer. A primer, used at a coating facility, applied to windshield or other glass, or to body openings, to prepare the glass or body opening for the application of glass bonding adhesives or the installation of adhesive bonded glass. Automobile and light-duty truck glass bonding primer includes glass bonding/cleaning primers that perform both functions (cleaning and priming of the windshield or other glass, or body openings) prior to the application of adhesive or the installation of adhesive bonded glass.
(64) Gloss reducer. A coating that is applied to a plastic part solely to reduce the shine of the part. A gloss reducer shall not be applied at a thickness of more than 0.5 millimeters of coating solids.
(65) Heat-resistant coating. A coating that must withstand a temperature of at least 204°C (400°F) during normal use.
(66) High build primer surface. A coating applied with a wet film thickness of 10 millimeters or more prior to the application of a topcoat for purposes of providing corrosion resistance, adhesion of subsequent coatings, or a moisture barrier, or promoting a uniform surface necessary for filling in surface imperfections.
(67) High bake. A coating which is designed to cure only at temperatures of more than 90°C (194°F).
(68) High gloss coating. Any coating which achieves at least 85 percent reflectance on a 60° meter.
(69) High volume low pressure spray. A coating application method by means of a spray gun which operates between 0.1 and 10.0 pounds per square inch gauge air cap pressure.
(70) In-line repair. The operation performed and coating(s) applied to correct damage or imperfections in the topcoat on parts that are not yet on a completely assembled vehicle. The curing of the coatings applied in these operations is accomplished at essentially the same temperature as that used for curing the previously applied topcoat. It is also referred to as high bake repair or high bake reprocess. In-line repair is considered part of the topcoat operation.
(71) Large appliance. Any surface-coated metal range, oven, microwave oven, refrigerator, freezer, washer, dryer, dishwasher, water heater, or trash compactor manufactured for household, commercial, or recreational use; including any parts thereof.
(72) Lower confidence limit approach. A set of approval criteria that must be met so that data from an alternative test method can be used in determining the capture efficiency of a control system as set forth in the EPA guidance document entitled ‘Guidelines for Determining Capture Efficiency’ (see table 1, section 200.9 of this Title).
(73) Lubricating wax/compound. A protective lubricating material, applied to vehicle hubs and hinges.
(74) Manufacturer’s formulation data. Data on a material (such as a coating) that are supplied by the material manufacturer based on knowledge of the ingredients used to manufacture that material, rather than based on an EPA reference test method. Manufacturer’s formulation data may include but are not limited to: information on density, VOC content, and coating solids content.
(75) Marine pleasure craft. Vessels which are manufactured or operated primarily for recreational purposes, or leased, rented, or chartered to a person or business for recreational purposes. The owner or operator of such vessels shall be responsible for certifying that the intended use is for recreational purposes.
(76) Marine pleasure craft coating. Any marine coating, except unsaturated polyester resin (fiberglass) coatings, applied by brush, spray, roller, or other means to a pleasure craft.
(77) Mask coating. A thin film coating applied through a template to coat a small portion of a substrate.
(78) Metal furniture coating. One or more coatings applied to the surfaces of furniture or components of furniture constructed either entirely or partially from metal. Metal furniture includes, but is not limited to, the following types of products: household, office, institutional, laboratory, hospital, public building, restaurant, barber and beauty shop, and dental furniture; including their components. Metal furniture also includes office and store fixtures, partitions, shelving, lockers, lamps and lighting fixtures, and wastebaskets.
(79) Metallic coating (miscellaneous metal parts, miscellaneous plastic parts, large appliance, and metal furniture). A coating which contains more than five grams of metal particles per liter of coating as applied. Metal particles are pieces of a pure elemental metal or a combination of elemental metals.
(80) Military specification coating. A coating which has a formulation approved by a United States Military Agency, for use on military equipment.
(81) Mobile equipment. Equipment which may be driven, or is capable of being driven on a roadway, including but not limited to:
(i) passenger cars, vans, sport utility vehicles;
(ii) trucks, truck cabs, truck bodies and truck trailers;
(iii) buses;
(iv) motorcycles;
(v) utility bodies;
(vi) camper shells;
(vii) mobile cranes;
(viii) bulldozers;
(ix) street cleaners;
(x) golf carts;
(xi) ground support vehicles, used in support of aircraft activities at airports; and
(xii) farm equipment.
(82) Mold seal coating. The initial coating applied to a new mold or a repaired mold to provide a smooth surface which, when coated with a mold release coating, prevents products from sticking to the mold.
(83) Motor vehicle adhesive. An adhesive, including glass bonding adhesive, used at a facility that is not an automobile or light-duty truck assembly coating facility, applied for the purpose of bonding two vehicle surfaces together without regard to the substrates involved.
(84) Motor vehicle glass bonding primer. A primer used at a facility that is not an automobile or light-duty truck assembly coating facility; applied to windshield or other glass, or to body openings, to prepare the glass or body opening for the application of glass bonding adhesives or the installation of adhesive bonded glass. It includes, cleaning primers that perform both functions (cleaning and priming of the windshield or other glass, or body openings) prior to the application of adhesive or the installation of adhesive bonded glass.
(85) Motor vehicle weatherstrip adhesive. An adhesive used at a facility that is not an automobile or light-duty truck assembly coating facility, applied to weatherstripping materials for the purpose of bonding the weatherstrip material to the surface of the vehicle.
(86) Multi-colored coating. A coating which exhibits more than one color when applied, and which means packaged in a single container and applied in a single coat.
(87) Multi-component coating. A coating requiring the addition of a separate reactive resin, commonly known as a catalyst or hardener, before application to form an acceptable dry film.
(88) Natural finish hardwood plywood panels. Panels whose original grain pattern, frequently supplemented by fillers or toners, is enhanced by transparent finishes.
(89) Opaque stain. Any stain that contains pigments, not classified as a semitransparent stain, including stains, glazes, and other opaque materials applied to wood surfaces.
(90) Optical coating. A coating applied to an optical lens.
(91) Overall removal efficiency. The total reduction of volatile organic compound emissions attributable to the use of both the capture system and the control equipment.
(92) Pan-backing coating. A coating applied to the surface of pots, pans, or other cooking implements that are exposed directly to a flame or other heating elements.
(93) Permanent total enclosure. An enclosure that meets the requirements of 40 CFR 63.805(e)(1)(i) through (iv) (see table 1, section 200.9 of this Title).
(94) Pigmented coat. Opaque coatings, applied either as an undercoat or a topcoat that contain binders and colored pigments and are formulated to conceal the wood surface.
(95) Plastic parts. Parts made from a substance that has been formed from a resin through the application of heat, pressure or both. These include but are not limited to: thermoplastics and thermosets such as acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, acrylic, cellulosics, nylon, polycarbonatevinyls, xenoy, melamines, polyester (BMC), reaction injection molding, and polyurethanes. These also include composites such as fiberglass-reinforced plastics, which are comprised of thermosetting or thermoplastic resins and fibers, filaments, or fine powders.
(96) Powder coating. Any coating applied as dry finely divided solid (without solvent or other carrier) which, when melted or fused, adheres to the substrate as a paint film.
(97) Pretreatment wash primer. A coating which contains no more than 12 percent solids, by weight, and at least 1/2 percent acids, by weight; is used to provide surface etching; and is applied directly to fiberglass and metal surfaces to provide corrosion resistance and adhesion of subsequent coatings.
(98) Pretreatment coating. A coating which contains no more than 12 percent solids, by weight, and at least 1/2 percent acid, by weight; is used to provide surface etching, and is applied directly to metal surfaces to provide corrosion resistance, adhesion, and ease of stripping.
(99) Printed interior panels. Panels whose grain or natural surface is obscured by fillers and basecoats upon which a simulated grain or decorative pattern is printed.
(100) Primer-surfacer. An intermediate protective coating applied over the electro deposition primer and under the topcoat. Primer-surfacer may also be called guide coat or surfacer. Primer-surfacer operations may include other coatings including, but not limited to: anti-chip, lower-body anti-chip, chip resistant edge primer, spot primer, blackout, deadener, interior color, and basecoat replacement coating; that is (are) applied in the same spray booths.
(101) Red coating. A coating which meets all of the following criteria:
(i) yellow limit: the hue of hostaperm scarlet;
(ii) blue limit: the hue of monastral red-violet;
(iii) lightness limit for metallics: 35 percent aluminum flake;
(iv) lightness limit for solids: 50 percent titanium dioxide white;
(v) solid reds: hue angle of -11 to 38 degrees and maximum lightness of 23 to 45 units;
(vi) metallic reds: hue angle of -16 to 35 degrees and maximum lightness of 28 to 45 units.
These criteria are based on Cielab color space, 0/45 geometry. For spherical geometry, specular included, the upper limit is 49 units.
(102) Repair coating. A coating used to re-coat portions of a previously coated product which has sustained mechanical damage to the coating following normal coating operations.
(103) Resist coating. A coating that is applied to a plastic part before metallic plating to prevent deposits of metal on portions of the plastic part.
(104) Sealer. Is defined based on specific coating processes as follows:
(i) Automobile and light-duty truck assembly sealer. A high viscosity material, used at an automobile or light-duty truck assembly coating facility, generally, but not always, applied in the paint shop after the body has received an electrodeposition primer coating and before the application of subsequent coatings (e.g., primer-surfacer). The primary purpose of automobile and light-duty truck sealer is to fill body joints completely so that there is no intrusion of water, gases or corrosive materials into the passenger area of the body compartment. Such materials are also referred to as sealant, sealant primer, or caulk; or
(ii) Motor vehicle sealer. A high viscosity material, used at a facility that is not an automobile or light-duty truck assembly coating facility, generally, but not always, applied after the body has received an electrodeposition primer coating and before the application of subsequent coatings (e.g., primer-surfacer). The primary purpose of the sealer is to fill body joints completely so that there is no intrusion of water, gases or corrosive materials into the passenger area of the body compartment. Such materials are also referred to as sealant, sealant primer, or caulk.
(iii) Wood finishing sealer. A coating which contains binders that seal a wood surface prior to application of a subsequent coating.
(105) Semi-transparent stain. Stains that contain dyes and/or semi-transparent pigments and are formulated to enhance wood grain and to change the color of the surface, but not to conceal it. Semi-transparent stains include but are not limited to sap stain, toner, non-grain raising stain, pad stain, spatter stain, and other semi-transparent stains.
(106) Shock-free coating. A coating applied to electrical components to protect the user from electric shock. The coating has characteristics of being of low capacitance and high resistance, and having resistance to breaking down under high voltage.
(107) Silicone-release coating. Any coating which contains silicone resin and is intended to prevent food from sticking to metal surfaces such as baking pans.
(108) Solar-absorbant coating. A coating which has as its prime purpose the absorption of solar radiation.
(109) Solids as applied. The part of the coating which remains after the coating is dried or cured. Solids content is determined using Method 311 or Method 24 as presented in Appendix A of both 40 CFR parts 63 and 60, respectively (see table 1, section 200.9 of this Title), manufacturer’s formulation data, or an alternative method approved by the administrator and the department. If there are any inconsistencies between the results of an EPA reference method test and any other means of determining the VOC content of a coating, then the EPA reference method test results will govern.
(110) Solids turnover ratio (R). The ratio of total volume of coating solids that is added to the electrodeposition primer (EDP) system in a calendar month divided by the total volume design capacity of the EDP system.
(111) Solvent. A substance that is liquid at standard conditions and is used to dissolve or dilute another substance; this term includes but is not limited to: organic materials used as dissolvers, viscosity reducers, degreasing agents, or cleaning agents. Any excluded compound is not a solvent.
(112) Stencil coating. Is defined based on coating process as follows:
(i) For miscellaneous metal and plastic parts stencil coating, an ink or pigmented coating which is rolled or brushed onto a template or stamp; in order to add identifying letters, symbols and/or numbers.
(ii) For automotive/transportation and business machine plastic parts surfaces stencil coating, a coating that is applied over a stencil to a plastic part at a thickness of one millimeter or less of coating solids.
(113) Substrate. The surface onto which a coating is applied, or into which a coating is impregnated.
(114) Temporary total enclosure. An enclosure that is not permanent; is constructed only to measure the capture efficiency of pollutants emitted from a given source; and meets the requirements of 40 CFR 63.805(e)(1)(i) through (iv) (see table 1, section 200.9 of this Title).
(115) Texture coat. A coating that is applied to a plastic part which, in its finished form, consists of discrete raised spots of the coating.
(116) Tile-board. A premium interior wall flat wood paneling product made of hardboard that is used in high moisture areas of the home such as kitchens and bathrooms. Specifically, tile-board meets the specifications for Class I hardboard as approved by the American National Standards Institute.
(117) Topcoat. Is defined based on coating process as follows:
(i) for automobile or light-duty truck assembly topcoat, the final coating system applied to provide the final color and/or a protective finish. The topcoat may be a monocoat color or basecoat/clearcoat system. In-line repair and two-tone are parts of topcoat. Topcoat operations may include other coating(s) (e.g., blackout, interior color, etc.) that is (are) applied in the same spray booth(s);
(ii) for pleasure craft surface coating topcoat, any final coating applied to the interior or exterior of a pleasure craft;
(iii) for wood finishing topcoat, any final coating applied to a wood or wood coated substrate.
(118) Touch-up coating. A coating used to cover minor coating imperfections appearing after the main coating operation.
(119) Translucent coating. A coating which contains binders and pigment, and is formulated to form a colored, but not opaque, film.
(120) Trunk interior coating. Is defined based on specific coating processes as follows:
(i) For automobile or light-duty truck assembly trunk interior coating, a coating, used at a coating facility outside of the primer-surfacer and topcoat operations, applied to the trunk interior to provide chip protection.
(ii) For motor vehicle truck interior coating, a coating, used at a facility that is not an automobile or light-duty truck assembly coating facility, applied to the trunk interior to provide chip protection.
(121) Two-component coating. A coating requiring the addition of a separate reactive resin, commonly known as a catalyst, before application to form an acceptable dry film.
(122) Underbody coating. A coating, applied to the undercarriage or firewall to prevent corrosion and/or provide chip protection.
(123) Vacuum-metalized coating (miscellaneous metal and plastic parts). The undercoat applied to the substrate on which the metal is deposited or the overcoat applied directly to the metal film. Vacuum metalizing/physical vapor deposition (PVD) is the process whereby metal is vaporized and deposited on a substrate in a vacuum chamber.
(124) Vacuum-metalized coating. Topcoats and basecoats that are used in the vacuum-metalizing process.
(125) VOC content limits. The permissible weight of VOC per volume of coating minus water and excluded compounds at application as specified in the tables of section 228-1.4 of this Subpart. The actual VOC content of the as applied coating is calculated as follows:
Equation 1
where:
(VOC)a is the VOC content of a coating, as applied, expressed as weight of VOC per volume of coating minus water and excluded compounds (keeping units consistent).
(Wv)a is the weight of total volatiles per volume of an as applied coating.
(Ww)a is the weight of water per volume of an as applied coating.
(Vw)a is the volumes of water per volume of an as applied coating.
(We)a is the weight of excluded VOC per volume of an as applied coating.
(Ve)a is the volumes of excluded VOC per volume of an as applied coating.
(126) Wash coat. A coating which contains binders that raise wood surfaces, prevent undesired staining, and control penetration.
(127) Weatherstrip adhesive. An adhesive, used at an automobile or light-duty truck assembly coating facility, applied to weatherstripping materials for the purpose of bonding it to the surface of a vehicle.
(128) Wood finishing. Consists of the application of one or more coatings, colored or clear (including but not limited to: stains, toners, wash-coats, sealers, and topcoats), to wood products.
6 CRR-NY 228-1.2
Current through December 31, 2021
End of Document