6 CRR-NY 232-1.2NY-CRR

OFFICIAL COMPILATION OF CODES, RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK
TITLE 6. DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION
CHAPTER III. AIR RESOURCES
SUBCHAPTER A. PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF AIR CONTAMINATION AND AIR POLLUTION
PART 232. DRY CLEANING FACILITIES
SUBPART 232-1. GENERAL PROVISIONS
6 CRR-NY 232-1.2
6 CRR-NY 232-1.2
232-1.2 Definitions.
(a) For the purpose of this Part, the general definitions of Part 200 apply.
(b) For the purpose of this Part, the following definitions shall also apply:
(1) Adsorptive cartridge filter. A replaceable cartridge filter that contains diatomaceous earth or activated clay as the filter medium for liquids.
(2) Alternative solvent. Any solvent, other than perc, used as the primary solvent in a dry cleaning machine.
(3) Approved alternative solvent. An alternative solvent that has been approved by the department for use, in New York State, as the primary solvent in a dry cleaning machine.
(4) Ancillary equipment. Equipment used in conjunction with dry cleaning machinery that includes, but is not limited to, emission control devices, pumps, filters, muck cookers, stills, process tanks, solvent containers, water separators, exhaust dampers, diverter valves, interconnecting piping, hoses, and ducts which convey or store solvent or solvent laden air.
(5) Articles. Clothing, garments, textiles, fabrics, leather goods, and the like, that are dry cleaned.
(6) Carbon adsorber. An air cleaning device that consists of an inlet for exhaust gases from a dry cleaning machine; activated carbon in the form of a fixed bed, cartridge, or canister, as an adsorbent; an outlet for exhaust gases; and a system to regenerate, or reclaim saturated adsorbent.
(7) Cartridge filter. A replaceable cartridge filter for liquid that contains one of the following as the filter medium: paper, activated carbon, or paper and activated carbon. Cartridge filters include, but are not limited to, the following: standard filters, split filters, jumbo filters, and all carbon polishing filters.
(8) Certified dry cleaning machine. A fourth generation perc dry cleaning machine that belongs to an equipment model, which was tested by the department's independent contractor prior to December 1, 2017 under the then existing Part 232 of this Title, and found to comply, in all respects, with the testing requirements and design and performance standards of Subpart 232-2 of this Part.
(9) Closed-loop machine. Dry cleaning equipment in which washing, extraction, and drying are all performed in the same single machine (also known as a dry-to-dry machine) and which recirculates solvent-laden vapor through a primary control system with no exhaust to the atmosphere during the drying cycle.
(10) Co-located commercial facility. A dry cleaning facility that is located in a building with another commercial business but no residences.
(11) Co-located residential facility. A dry cleaning facility that is located in a building with a residence, and which may also contain another commercial business.
(12) Colorimetric detector tube. A glass tube (sealed prior to use) containing material impregnated with a chemical that is sensitive to specific gases or vapors and is designed to measure the concentration of that gas or vapor.
(13) Condenser. An air cleaning device that removes condensable vapors by a reduction in the temperature of the exhaust gases or, in the case of a surface condenser, by contact of the exhaust gases with structures that are cooled by a circulating cooling fluid.
(14) Converted machine. A vented dry-to-dry second generation perc machine that was converted to a third generation perc machine or a third generation perc machine that was converted to a fourth generation perc machine with both primary and secondary emission controls.
(15) Cool-down phase (reduction). The portion of the drying cycle that begins when the heating mechanism deactivates and the refrigerated condenser continues to operate and reduce the temperature of the air recirculating through the drum to reduce the concentration of solvent in the drum.
(16) Desorption. The regeneration or stripping of an activated carbon bed, through the removal of the adsorbed solvent using hot air, steam, or other means.
(17) Dip tank. A separate tank that contains solvent and is used for purposes other than dry cleaning (e.g., waterproofing).
(18) Diverter valve. A flow control device that prevents room air from passing through a refrigerated condenser when the door of a dry cleaning machine is open.
(19) Drum. The rotating cylinder or wheel of a dry cleaning machine that holds the articles being cleaned.
(20) Drum evacuation system. A mechanical system, which is activated after completion of the drying cycle, that isolates the drum from the rest of the machine using a series of dampers and then activates a fan to draw fresh room air into the drum and vent any residual solvent vapor to the atmosphere.
(21) Dry cleaning. A process used to remove soil, grease, paint and other unwanted substances from articles with the use of a solvent other than water.
(22) Dry cleaning control system. Equipment (e.g., carbon adsorber, refrigerated condenser, etc.) or an air cleaning device used to reduce the amount of air pollutant(s) in an air stream prior to discharge to the atmosphere.
(23) Dry cleaning equipment. Any machine, device, or apparatus used to dry clean articles.
(24) Dry cleaning facility. A facility with one or more dry cleaning systems.
(25) Dry cleaning system. All of the following equipment, devices, or apparatus associated with dry cleaning operations, including, but not limited to: dry cleaning equipment; filter or purification systems; waste holding, treatment, or disposal systems; solvent supply systems; dip tanks; pumps; gaskets; piping, ducting, fittings, valves, or flanges that convey solvent-contaminated air; and dry cleaning control systems.
(26) Dryer. A transfer machine used to remove solvent from articles of clothing or other textile or leather goods, after washing and removing of excess solvent, together with the piping and ductwork used in the installation of this device.
(27) Drying cabinet. A housing unit, in which solvent laden articles are transferred for drying, in a separate machine designed for delicate fabrics that might otherwise be damaged by the heat and tumbling action of the standard drying cycle.
(28) Drying cycle. For the purposes of this regulation, the drying cycle is defined as that part of the dry cleaning cycle which actively removes the residual solvent in the dry cleaned articles after washing and extraction. For closed-loop machines, the heated portion of the cycle is followed by a cool-down phase which may be extended by the activation of a secondary control system. The drying cycle begins when heating coils are activated and ends when the machine ceases rotation of the drum.
(29) Drying sensor. A device that automatically controls the drying cycle by sensing when articles are relatively dry. Drying sensors include, but are not limited to, infrared analyzers, float switches, and resistance probes. The device detects the vapor concentration of solvents in the drying air or when the liquid solvent recovery rate is minimized. Drying sensors extend the drying cycle for a minimum time beyond the activation point to ensure dry articles.
(30) Dry-to-dry machine. Dry cleaning equipment in which washing, extraction, and drying are all performed in the same single unit.
(31) Dry-to-dry vented machine. Dry cleaning equipment in which washing, extraction, and drying are all performed in the same single unit and in which fresh air is introduced into the drum in the last step of the drying cycle and exhausted to the outdoor atmosphere, either directly or through a control device (second generation equipment).
(32) Environmental training program. An initial course or a refresher course of the environmental training program, described in section 232-2.10 of this Part, for owner/managers and/or operators of perc dry cleaning equipment that has been authorized by the department.
(33) Existing machine or facility. A dry cleaning machine that was installed, or a dry cleaning facility that began operating, prior to the effective date of this Part and for which operation has not been terminated.
(34) External door fan. A local exhaust ventilation system designed to provide for a minimum inward air velocity of 100 feet per minute through the dry cleaning machine door upon opening and where the solvent emissions are controlled by a carbon adsorber prior to venting to the outside air.
(35) Filter muck. The residue collected from a filter.
(36) First generation equipment. Transfer machines where cleaning and drying take place in separate machines that use or reclaim perc solvent and require the manual transfer of articles from one machine to another.
(37) Flash point. The lowest temperature at which a liquid can form an ignitable mixture in air, near the surface of the liquid, as tested using acceptable standardized methods. Flash point must be determined by a Pensky-Martens Closed Cup Tester Materials Standard D-93-79 or D-93-80; or a Setaflash Closed Cup Tester, using the method specified in the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) and the test method specified in ASTM Standard D-3278-78; or as determined by an equivalent test method approved by the commissioner as set forth in 6 NYCRR 370.3[b] (see section 370.1[e] of this Title).
(38) Fourth generation machine. A non-vented, closed-loop perc dry cleaning machine with both a primary (refrigerated condenser with drying sensor) and secondary control system (integral carbon adsorber).
(39) Fugitive emissions control system. An external door fan, internal door fan, or other system which is activated after completion of the drying cycle and upon machine door opening that reduces the solvent vapor concentration in the machine drum with a carbon adsorber.
(40) General exhaust ventilation system. A mechanical exhaust ventilation system with outside air inlets and one or more exhaust fan outlets in a dry cleaning facility. This type of system is commonly used to exhaust the air from a dry cleaning workroom or a vapor barrier room.
(41) Halogenated-hydrocarbon detector. A portable device that emits an audible signal or presents a visual indicator when detecting significant vapor concentrations of perc and other halogenated-hydrocarbons.
(42) Internal door fan. A system, which is activated after completion of the drying cycle and upon machine door opening, that reduces the solvent vapor concentration in the drum by drawing fresh room air into the drum and then passing the air-solvent mixture through an integral carbon adsorber before recirculating the air-solvent mixture back into the drum.
(43) Liquid leak. A leak containing one or more liquid drops of solvent every three minutes.
(44) Local exhaust ventilation system. A mechanical exhaust ventilation system connected directly to a dry cleaning machine or other related dry cleaning equipment. For example, the exhaust system on an external door fan from a third generation machine is a local exhaust ventilation system.
(45) Major dry cleaning facility. Any dry cleaning facility that emits, or has the potential to emit, more than 10 tons per year of a Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) is considered a major facility as defined in Part 201 of this Title. Additionally, facilities that emit Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) may also be considered major depending upon their location and mass emission rate.
(i) Perchloroethylene (Perc) is classified as a HAP and dry cleaners using perc are considered major dry cleaning facilities if their yearly perc consumption is greater than 2,100 gallons per year as determined according to section 232-2.8(b)(3) of this Part.
(ii) Dry cleaners using alternative solvents which are classified as VOCs may be considered major dry cleaning facilities if their yearly solvent consumption exceeds 6,000 gallons. The VOC major facility threshold may be higher for alternative solvent dry cleaning facilities depending on the location of the facility, the solvent density and the amount of solvent disposed of as waste.
(46) Muck cooker. A device that heats filter muck to release solvent vapors for reclaiming.
(47) New machine or facility. A dry cleaning machine installed, or a dry cleaning facility commencing operation, after the effective date of this Part and for which operation has not been terminated.
(48) Notice of dry cleaning equipment shutdown. A form to be completed by the owner, or owner's representative, to effectuate the required departmental notification when the operation of any perc or alternative solvent dry cleaning machine is terminated and taken out of service.
(49) Petroleum solvent. A hydrocarbon solvent.
(50) Perceptible leak. Any solvent vapor or liquid leak that is obvious because of odor, gas flow rate or by visible pools or droplets of solvent. Vapor leaks are considered perceptible when the gas flow can be detected by passing a finger over the surface of the equipment or through the use of an appropriate portable monitoring instrument.
(51) Perc. A colorless volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon. Perc is also known as perchloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, tetrachloroethene, and PCE.
(52) ppb. Parts per billion by volume in air or by weight in water.
(53) ppm. Parts per million by volume in air or by weight in water.
(54) Primary control system. A water cooled condenser or refrigerated condenser on an alternative solvent dry cleaning machine, or the refrigerated condenser on a perc dry cleaning machine, that is used to recover condensed solvent vapor and reduce the recirculating solvent vapor concentration in the drum.
(55) Process tank. Any container for solvent that is an integral part of a dry cleaning machine.
(56) Refrigerated condenser. A closed-loop vapor recovery system into which solvent vapors are condensed by cooling below the condensation point of the solvent using a mechanical refrigerated system.
(57) Residence. Any dwelling or housing in which people reside excluding short-term housing that is occupied by the same person for a period of less than 180 days (such as a hotel room).
(58) Second generation machine. A dry-to-dry vented perc dry cleaning machine which is not vented to a refrigerated condenser.
(59) Secondary control system. A device or apparatus that reduces the concentration of solvent in the recirculating air after the end of the cool-down phase beyond the level achievable with a primary control system alone. For example, an integral carbon adsorber used in a fourth generation machine is a secondary control system.
(60) Self-service dry cleaning machine. A dry cleaning machine that is loaded, activated, or unloaded by the customer.
(61) Solvent mileage. The average weight of articles cleaned per volume of solvent used.
(62) Solvent recovery dryer. A transfer machine that is in a class of dry cleaning dryers that employ a condenser to recover solvent vapors evaporated in a closed-loop stream of heated air, together with the piping and ductwork used in the installation of this device.
(63) Stand-alone facility. A dry cleaning facility that is located in a building without any other commercial business or residence.
(64) Statement of compliance. A notarized document issued by a manufacturer, or manufacturer's representative, affirming that a fourth generation perc dry cleaning machine model was tested and found to comply, in all respects, with the design and performance standards found in section 232-2.4 of this Part.
(65) Still. Distillation equipment used to volatilize and recover purified solvent from contaminated solvent removed from the cleaned articles.
(66) Third generation machine. A closed-loop perc dry cleaning machine equipped with a refrigerated condenser. Third generation machines must be equipped with an external door fan, controlled by a carbon adsorber, that vents to the outside air upon completion of the drying cycle and after the machine door is opened.
(67) Trained operator. A person who holds a certificate of completion for the initial course of an environmental training program for owner/managers and/or operators of perc dry cleaning equipment and maintains her/his current certification status by successfully completing refresher courses as required.
(68) Transfer machine. Any dry cleaning machine in which washing, washing with extraction, extraction or drying is performed in a single machine that requires the transfer of articles from one machine to another to complete the dry cleaning process.
(69) Uncertified dry cleaning machine. A perc dry cleaning machine that belongs to an equipment model never tested by the department's independent contractor to verify compliance with all the testing requirements and design and performance standards of Subpart 232-2 of this Part for fourth generation machines.
(70) Vapor barrier. A material surface or coating that is impermeable to a dry cleaning solvent.
(71) Vapor barrier room. A room that encloses the dry cleaning machine(s) and is constructed of material that is impermeable to the applicable solvent, designed and operated to maintain negative pressure at all times when the equipment is operating, and is used with a general exhaust ventilation system.
(72) Vapor leak. A fugitive emission of solvent vapor from unintended openings in the dry cleaning system. A vapor leak can be detected by an audible signal or visual signal from a halogenated-hydrocarbon detector or other approved instrument.
(73) Water cooled condenser. A closed-loop vapor recovery system that uses water as a coolant to condense and recover solvent vapor by cooling the vapor below the condensation point of the solvent.
(74) Wastewater evaporator. A wastewater treatment unit that treats solvent-contaminated wastewater by physical separation (water separator) and double carbon filtration prior to evaporation through physical action, or the addition of thermal energy.
(75) Water separator. A vessel that uses gravity to physically separate liquid solvent from liquid water.
(76) Yearly. Once every 365 days or 366 days for a timespan with a leap day.
6 CRR-NY 232-1.2
Current through February 15, 2022
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