14 CRR-NY 624.4NY-CRR

OFFICIAL COMPILATION OF CODES, RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK
TITLE 14. DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HYGIENE
CHAPTER XIV. OFFICE FOR PEOPLE WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES
PART 624. REPORTABLE INCIDENTS AND NOTABLE OCCURRENCES
14 CRR-NY 624.4
14 CRR-NY 624.4
624.4 Notable occurrences, defined.
(a) Notable occurrences are events or situations that meet the definitions in subdivision (c) of this section and occur under the auspices of an agency.
(b) Notable occurrences do not include events and situations that meet the definition of a reportable incident in section 624.3 of this Part even if the event or situation otherwise meets the definition of one of the categories in subdivision (c) of this section. An exception is that a death that also meets the definition of a reportable incident must be reported both as the reportable incident and as a notable occurrence.
(c) Serious and minor notable occurrences are defined and categorized as follows:
(1) the following types of incidents prior to January 1, 2016:
(i) injury.
(a) Minor notable occurrence. Any suspected or confirmed harm, hurt, or damage to an individual receiving services, caused by an act of that individual or another, whether or not by accident, and whether or not the cause can be identified, that results in an individual requiring medical or dental treatment (see glossary, section 624.20 of this Part) by a physician, dentist, physician's assistant, or nurse practitioner, and such treatment is more than first aid. Illness in itself shall not be reported as an injury or any other type of incident or occurrence.
(b) Serious notable occurrence. Any injury that results in the admission of a person to a hospital for treatment or observation because of injury.
Note:
In accordance with section 624.3(b)(9)(i)(e) of this Part, an injury due to self-injurious behavior that requires medical care beyond first aid is a reportable incident.
(ii) unauthorized absence. The unexpected or unauthorized absence of a person after formal search procedures (see glossary, section 624.20 of this Part) have been initiated by the agency. Reasoned judgments, taking into consideration the person's habits, deficits, capabilities, health problems, etc., shall determine when formal search procedures need to be implemented. It is required that formal search procedures must be initiated immediately upon discovery of an absence involving a person whose absence constitutes a recognized potential danger to the wellbeing of the person or others. Any unauthorized absence event is considered a serious notable occurrence.
Note:
In accordance with section 624.3(b)(9)(i)(c) of this Part, an unauthorized absence that results in exposure to risk of injury to the person receiving services is a reportable missing person incident.
(iii) death. The death of any person receiving services, regardless of the cause of death, is a serious notable occurrence. This includes all deaths of individuals who live in residential facilities operated or certified by OPWDD and other deaths that occur under the auspices of an agency.
(iv) choking, with no known risk. For the purposes of this paragraph, partial or complete blockage of the upper airway by an inhaled or swallowed foreign body, including food, that leads to a partial or complete inability to breathe, other than a reportable choking, with known risk, incident (see section 624.3[b][9][i][d] of this Part), involving an individual with a known risk for choking and a written directive addressing that risk. Any choking with no known risk event is considered a serious notable occurrence.
(v) theft and financial exploitation.
(a) Minor notable occurrence. Any suspected theft of a service recipient's personal property (including personal funds or belongings) or financial exploitation, involving values of more than $15 and less than or equal to $100, that does not involve a credit, debit, or public benefit card, and that is an isolated event.
(b) Serious notable occurrence. Any suspected theft of a service recipient's personal property (including personal funds or belongings) or financial exploitation, involving a value of more than $100; theft involving a service recipient's credit, debit, or public benefit card (regardless of the amount involved); or a pattern of theft or financial exploitation involving the property of one or more individuals receiving services.
(vi) sensitive situations. Those situations involving a person receiving services that do not meet the criteria of the definitions in subparagraphs (i)-(v) of this paragraph or the definitions of reportable incidents as defined in section 624.3 of this Part, that may be of a delicate nature to the agency, and that are reported to ensure awareness of the circumstances. Sensitive situations shall be defined in agency policies and procedures, and shall include, but not be limited to, possible criminal acts committed by an individual receiving services. Sensitive situations are serious notable occurrences.
(vii) ICF violations. Events and situations concerning residents of intermediate care facilities (ICFs) that are identified as violations in Federal regulation applicable to ICFs and do not meet the definitions of reportable incidents as specified in section 624.3 of this Part or other notable occurrences as specified in this section. ICF violations are serious notable occurrences.
(2) the following types of incidents on and after January 1, 2016:
(i) serious notable occurrences:
(a) death. The death of any person receiving services, regardless of the cause of death. This includes all deaths of individuals who live in residential facilities operated or certified by OPWDD and other deaths that occur under the auspices of an agency;
(b) sensitive situations. Those situations involving a person receiving services that do not meet the definitions of other incidents in section 624.3 of this Part or in this subdivision, but that may be of a delicate nature to the agency, and are reported to ensure awareness of the circumstances. Sensitive situations must be defined in agency policies and procedures, and include, but not be limited to, possible criminal acts committed by an individual receiving services.
(ii) minor notable occurrences:
(a) theft or financial exploitation, minor notable occurrence. Any suspected theft of a service recipient's personal property (including personal funds or belongings) or financial exploitation, involving values of more than $15 and less than or equal to $100, that does not involve a credit, debit, or public benefit card, and that is an isolated event; and
(b) injury, minor notable occurrence. Any suspected or confirmed harm, hurt, or damage to an individual receiving services, caused by an act of that individual or another, whether or not by accident, and whether or not the cause can be identified, that results in an individual requiring medical or dental treatment (see glossary, section 624.20 of this Part) by a physician, dentist, physician's assistant, or nurse practitioner, and such treatment is more than first aid.
14 CRR-NY 624.4
Current through August 31, 2017
End of Document© 2017 Thomson Reuters. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.