17 CRR-NY 75.1NY-CRR

OFFICIAL COMPILATION OF CODES, RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK
TITLE 17. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
CHAPTER III. AIRPORTS
PART 75. APPROVAL OF PRIVATELY OWNED AIRPORTS
17 CRR-NY 75.1
17 CRR-NY 75.1
75.1 Definitions.
For the purposes of this Part, the terms hereinafter listed shall mean as follows:
(a) Landing area.
Any locality, either of land or water, including airports and intermediate landing fields, which is used or intended to be used for the landing and takeoff of aircraft, whether or not facilities are provided for shelter, servicing or repair of aircraft or for receiving or discharging passengers or cargo.
(b) Airport.
Any landing area used regularly by aircraft for receiving or discharging passengers or cargo; or for the landing and takeoff of aircraft being used for personal or training purposes.
(c) Airport improvement.
The extension, alteration, addition to or realignment of the runway(s) of an existing airport, or the modification in any way of the landing or takeoff directions at such an airport.
(d) Approach surface.
(1) For airports used by fixed-wing aircraft.
An imaginary plane sloping upward from a point at the same elevation as, and 200 feet from, the appropriate runway end to provide the required clearances above roads, waterways and railroads. (See Exhibit A [Appendix A-6, infra] for applicable approach surface dimensions.)
(2) For heliports.
An imaginary plane sloping upward from the helipad primary surface to provide the required clearances above roads, waterways and railroads. (See Exhibit B [Appendix A-6, infra] for applicable approach surface dimensions.)
(e) Approach zone.
A trapezoidal area formed by the projection of the approach surface onto the ground directly below the approach surface. Approach zone dimensions are the same as those of the associated approach surface and vary according to runway category, as shown in Exhibit C for airports and Exhibit D for heliports (Appendix A-6, infra) (see “approach surface”, subdivision [d] of this section).
(f) Primary surface.
That surface which is longitudinally centered on a runway or landing area centerline extending the full length of either side of, and 200 feet beyond the ends of, a runway. It is the same elevation as the nearest point of the runway centerline. The primary surface width will vary according to the runway category (see dimension A on Exhibit A). The primary surface of a helipad is the overall size of the landing area (see dimensions R & S on Exhibit B) (Appendix A-6, infra).
(g) Lateral transition surface.
An area on each side of the primary surface of the runway or landing area and approach surface. The lateral transition surface slopes upward and outward on a seven-to-one plane for airports and a two-to-one plane for heliports (see Exhibits C and D [Appendix A-6, infra] for applicable lateral transition surface dimensions for airports and heliports, respectively). The same clearances apply for lateral transition surfaces as apply for approach surfaces (see Exhibits A and B [Appendix A-6, infra]).
(h) Lateral transition zone.
An area on the ground formed by the projection of the lateral transition surface onto the ground directly below the lateral transition surface. Lateral transition zone dimensions are the same as those of the associated lateral transition surface and vary according to runway category, as shown in Exhibit C for airports and Exhibit D for heliports (Appendix A-6, infra) (see “lateral transition surface”, subdivision [g] of this section).
(i) Visual runway.
A runway intended solely for the operation of aircraft using visual approach procedures, with no straight-in instrument approach procedure and no instrument designations. There are two types of visual runways:
(1) Utility runway.
A runway that is constructed for, and intended to be used by, propeller-driven aircraft of 12,500 pounds maximum gross weight and less.
(2) Larger than utility runway.
A runway that is constructed for, and intended to be used by, propeller-driven aircraft of more than 12,500 pounds maximum gross weight, and turbofan and turbojet aircraft.
(j) Non-precision instrument runway.
A runway having an existing instrument approach procedure utilizing air navigation facilities with only horizontal guidance, or area-type navigation equipment, for which a straight-in, non-precision instrument approach procedure has been approved, or planned, and for which no precision approach facilities are planned, or indicated on an approved FAA planning document.
(k) Precision instrument runway.
A runway having an existing instrument approach procedure utilizing an Instrument Landing System (ILS). It also means a runway for which a precision approach system is planned and is also indicated on an FAA-approved airport layout plan or any other FAA planning document.
(l) Instrument Landing System (ILS).
An Instrument Landing System (ILS) is a system which provides aircraft the lateral, longitudinal and vertical guidance necessary for a landing.
(m) Aircraft operation.
Either a landing or takeoff by an aircraft.
(n) Aircraft.
Any contrivance, now or hereafter invented, for avigation of or flight in the air, except a parachute or other contrivance designed for use as, and carried primarily for, safety equipment.
(1) Fixed-wing aircraft.
An aircraft, the support of which in the air is normally derived from airfoils that are stationary.
(2) Helicopter/rotary-wing aircraft.
An aircraft, the support of which in the air is normally derived from airfoils mechanically rotated about an approximately vertical axis.
(3) Balloon.
An aircraft, the support of which in the air is normally derived from its own buoyancy.
(o) Heliport/helipad.
An airport used exclusively by helicopters (see “airport”, subdivision [b] of this section).
(p) Seaplane operational area.
That part of a body of water on which seaplane operations take place.
(q) Approach/departure paths.
The centerline of approach surfaces (see “approach surface”, subdivision [d] of this section).
17 CRR-NY 75.1
Current through May 15, 2021
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