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§ 687. Manner of Scoring Butter.

3 CA ADC § 687BARCLAYS OFFICIAL CALIFORNIA CODE OF REGULATIONS

Barclays Official California Code of Regulations Currentness
Title 3. Food and Agriculture
Division 2. Animal Industry
Chapter 1. Dairies
Article 24. Butter Grades
3 CCR § 687
§ 687. Manner of Scoring Butter.
In accordance with the provisions of Section 37102 of the Food and Agricultural Code, the manner for determining the method of scoring butter and for establishing quality ratings in butter shall be as follows:
(a) The flavor shall be classified in accordance with paragraph (e).
(b) The defects in body, color and salt shall be rated in accordance with paragraph (f).
(c) The relation of the quality of the butter to the flavor classification of it as affected by total defects in body, color and salt, shall be determined in accordance with paragraph (g).
(d) Butter with flavor defects, such as woody, barney, metallic, sour, onion, garlic, or yeasty shall be classified as impure or rancid in the case of lipase. Such butter may be used for renovating purposes.
(e) Various identified flavors in butter shall be classified as follows:
Flavor Classification
Flavor Ratings
93
92
90
Less than 90
First
First
Second
Cooking
Identified Flavor
quality
quality
quality
and baking
Feed
 
S
D
P
Cooked
 
D
D
Acid
 
 
S
D
Aged
 
 
S
D
Bitter
 
 
S
D
Coarse
 
 
S
Flat
 
 
S
Smothered
 
 
S
D
Storage
 
 
S
D
Malty
 
 
S
D
Musty
 
 
S
D
Neutralizer
 
 
S
D
Scorched
 
 
S
D
Utensil
 
 
S
D
Weed
 
 
S
D
Whey
 
 
S
D
Old cream
 
 
D
S -Slight D -Definite P -Pronounced
When more than one flavor is discernible in a sample of butter, the flavor classification of the sample shall be established on the basis of the flavor that carries the lowest classification.
(f) (1) Defects and disratings for body, color and salt are:
Disratings
Defects
Slight
Definite
Pronounced
Body
Crumbly
 
1/2
1
Gummy
 
1/2
1
Leaky
 
1/2
1
Mealy or Grainy
 
1/2
1
2
Short
 
1/2
1
Weak
 
1/2
1
Sticky
 
1/2
1
Ragged boring
 
1
2
Disratings
Color
Slight
Definite
Pronounced
Wavy
 
1/2
1
Mottled
 
1
2
Streaked
 
1
2
Color Specks
 
1
2
Salt
Sharp
 
1/2
1
Gritty
 
1
2
(g) The flavor classification and maximum disratings for defects in body and color and salt permitted for each California grade follows:
Flavor
Maximum defect
Classification
disrating permitted
California grade
93 First quality
 
1
First quality
93 First quality
 
1 1/2
Second quality
92 First quality
 
1/2
First quality
92 First quality
 
1
Second quality
92 First quality
 
1 1/2
Cooking and baking
90 Second quality
 
1/2
Second quality
90 Second quality
 
1
Cooking and baking
(h) Terms used in subsections (e) and (f) of this section are those defined as follows:
SLIGHT. An attribute which is barely identifiable and present only to a small degree.
DEFINITE. An attribute which is readily identifiable and present to a substantial degree.
PRONOUNCED. An attribute which is markedly identifiable and present to a large degree.
AGED. Characterized by lack of freshness.
BITTER. Astringent, similar to taste of quinine and produces a puckery sensation.
ACID. Lacks a delicate flavor or aroma and is associated with an acid condition but there is no indication of sourness.
COOKED. Smooth, nutty-like character resembling a custard flavor.
COARSE. Lacks a fine, delicate smooth flavor.
FEED. Aromatic flavor characteristic of feeds eaten by cows.
FLAT. Lacks natural butter flavor.
MALTY. A distinctive, harsh flavor suggestive of malt.
MUSTY. Suggestive of the aroma of a damp vegetable cellar.
NEUTRALIZER. Suggestive of a bicarbonate of soda flavor or the flavor of similar compounds.
OLD CREAM. Aged cream characterized by lack of freshness and imparts a rough aftertaste on the tongue.
SCORCHED. A more intensified flavor than coarse and imparts a harsh aftertaste suggestive of excessive heating.
SMOTHERED. Suggestive of improperly cooled cream.
STORAGE. Characterized by lack of freshness and more intensified than “aged” flavor.
UTENSIL. A flavor suggestive of unclean cans, utensils and equipment.
WEED. Aromatic flavor characteristic of the weeds eaten by cows.
WHEY. A flavor and aroma characteristic of cheese whey.
TERMS RELATING TO BODY
CRUMBLY. When a “crumbly” body is present the particles lack cohesion. The intensity is described as “slight” when the trier plug tends to break and the butter lacks plasticity; and “definite” when the butter breaks roughly or crumbles.
GUMMY. Gummy-bodied butter does not melt readily and is inclined to stick to the roof of the mouth. The intensity is described as “slight” when the butter tends to become chewy and “definite” when it imparts a gum-like impression in the mouth.
LEAKY. A “leaky” body is present when on visual examination there are beads of moisture on the surface of the trier plug and on the back of the trier, or when slight pressure is applied to the butter on the trier plug. The intensity is described as “slight” when the droplets or beads of moisture are barely visible and about the size of a pinhead; “definite” when the moisture drops are somewhat larger or the droplets are more numerous and tend to run together; and “pronounced” when the leaky condition is so evident that drops of water drip from the trier plug.
MEALY OR GRAINY. A “mealy” or “grainy” condition imparts a granular consistency when the butter is melted on the tongue. The intensity is described as “slight” when the mealiness or graininess is barely detectable on the tongue and “definite” when the mealiness or graininess is readily detectable.
RAGGED BORING. A “ragged boring” body in contrast to a solid boring, is when a sticky-crumbly condition is present to such a degree that a full trier of butter cannot be drawn. The intensity is described as “slight” when there is considerable adherence of butter to the back of the trier and “definite” when it is practically impossible to draw a full plug of butter.
SHORT. The texture is short-grained, lacks plasticity and tends toward brittleness. The intensity is described as “slight” when the butter lacks pliability and tends to be brittle; and “definite” when sharp and distinct breaks form as pressure is applied against the plug.
STICKY. When a “sticky” condition is present, the butter adheres to the trier as a smear and possesses excessive adhesion. The intensity is described as “slight” when the smear is present only on a portion of the back of the trier and “definite” when the trier becomes smeary throughout its length.
WEAK. A “weak” body lacks firmness and tends to be spongy. The intensity is described as “slight” when the plug of butter, under slight pressure, tends to depress and is not firm and compact; and “definite” when the plug of butter, under slight pressure, tends to depress easily and definitely lacks firmness and compactness.
TERMS RELATING TO COLOR
MOTTLED. “Mottled” appears as a dappled condition with spots of lighter and deeper shades of yellow. The intensity is described as “slight” when the small spots of different shades of yellow, irregular in shape, are barely discernible on the plug of butter and “definite” when the mottles are readily discernible on the plug of butter.
SPECKS. “Specks” usually appear in butter as small white or dark yellow particles, however, they may be of variable size. The intensity is described as “slight” when the particles are few in number and “definite” when they are noticeable in large numbers.
STREAKED. “Streaked” color appears as light colored portions surrounded by more highly colored portions. The intensity is described as “slight” when only a few are present and “definite” when they are more numerous on the trier plug.
WAVY. “Wavy” color in butter is an unevenness in the color that appears as waves of different shades of yellow. The intensity is described as “slight” when the waves are barely discernible and “definite” when they are readily noticeable on the trier plug.
TERMS RELATING TO SALT
SHARP. “Sharp” salt is characterized by taste sensations suggestive of salt. The intensity is described as “slight” when the salt taste predominates in flavor; and “definite” when the salt taste distinctly predominates in flavor.
GRITTY. A “gritty” salt condition is detected by the sandlike feel of the grains of undissolved salt, on the tongue or between the teeth when the butter is chewed. The intensity is described as “slight” when only a few grains of undissolved salt are detected and “definite” when the condition is more readily noticeable.
Note: Authority cited: Sections 407 and 37102, Food and Agricultural Code. Reference: Sections 37101, 37102, 37131 and 37291, Food and Agricultural Code.
HISTORY
1. New section filed 10-7-49 (Register 18, No. 2).
2. Amendment filed 9-21-56; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 56, No. 18).
3. Amendment filed 2-23-62; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 62, No. 4).
4. Amendment filed 4-25-75 as procedural and organizational; effective upon filing (Register 75, No. 17).
5. Amendment filed 2-26-82; effective thirtieth day thereafter (Register 82, No. 9).
This database is current through 7/29/22 Register 2022, No. 30
3 CCR § 687, 3 CA ADC § 687
End of Document