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§ 11090. Computation of Time Periods: Twelve Workweeks; Minimum Duration.

2 CA ADC § 11090BARCLAYS OFFICIAL CALIFORNIA CODE OF REGULATIONS

Barclays Official California Code of Regulations Currentness
Title 2. Administration
Division 4.1. Department of Fair Employment and Housing
Chapter 5. Fair Employment and Housing Council
Subchapter 2. Discrimination in Employment
Article 11. California Family Rights Act
2 CCR § 11090
§ 11090. Computation of Time Periods: Twelve Workweeks; Minimum Duration.
(a) CFRA leave does not need to be taken in one continuous period of time. It cannot exceed more than 12 workweeks total for any purpose in a 12-month period.
(b) If the leave is common to both CFRA and FMLA, this 12-month period will run concurrently with the 12-month period under FMLA. An employer may choose any of the methods (the calendar year, any fixed 12-month “leave year,” the 12-month period measured forward from the date any employee's first CFRA leave begins, or a “rolling” 12-month period measured backward from the date an employee uses any CFRA leave) allowed in the FMLA regulations that became effective March 8, 2013, 29 C.F.R. Part 825, section 825.200, subdivision (b), for determining the 12-month period in which the 12 weeks of CFRA leave entitlement occurs. The employer must, however, apply the chosen method consistently and uniformly to all employees in California and notify employees requesting CFRA leave of its chosen method. If an employer fails to select one of the above methods for measuring the 12-month period, the method that provides the most beneficial outcome for the employee will be used. An employer wishing to change to another method is required to give at least 60 days' notice to all employees, and the transition must take place in such a way that the employees retain the full benefit of 12 weeks of leave under whichever method affords the greatest benefit to the employee. Under no circumstance may a new method be implemented in order to avoid the Act's leave requirements.
(c) “Twelve workweeks” as that term is defined in section 11087(s), means the equivalent of 12 of the employee's normally scheduled workweeks. For eligible employees who work more or less than five days a week, or who work on alternative work schedules, the number of working days that constitutes 12 workweeks is calculated on a pro rata or proportional basis. If an employee's schedule varies from week to week to such an extent that an employer is unable to determine with any certainty how many hours the employee would otherwise have worked (but for the taking of CFRA leave), a weekly average of the hours scheduled over the 12 months prior to the beginning of the leave period (including any hours for which the employee took leave of any type) shall be used for calculating the employee's leave entitlement.
(1) For example, for a full-time employee who works five eight-hour days per week, 12 workweeks means 60 working and/or paid eight-hour days of leave entitlement. For an employee who works half time, 12 workweeks may mean 30 eight-hour days or 60 four-hour days, or 12 workweeks of whatever is the employee's normal half-time work schedule. For an employee who normally works six eight-hour days, 12 workweeks means 72 working and/or paid eight-hour days of leave entitlement.
(2) If an employee takes leave on an intermittent or reduced work schedule, only the amount of leave actually taken may be counted toward the 12 weeks of leave to which the employee is entitled. For example, if an employee needs physical therapy that requires an absence from work of two hours a week, only those two hours may be charged against the employee's CFRA leave entitlement. If an employee needs leave intermittently or on a reduced leave schedule for planned medical treatment, then the employee must make a reasonable effort to schedule the treatment so as not to disrupt unduly the employer's operations.
(3) If a holiday falls within a week taken as CFRA leave, the week is nevertheless counted as a week of CFRA leave. If, however, the employer's business activity has temporarily ceased for some reason and employees generally are not expected to report for work for one or more weeks, (e.g., a school closing for two weeks for the Christmas/New Year holiday or summer vacation or an employer closing the plant for retooling), the days the employer's activities have ceased do not count against the employee's CFRA entitlement. Similarly, if an employee uses CFRA leave in increments of less than one week, the fact that a holiday may occur within a week in which an employee partially takes leave does not count against the employee's CFRA entitlement unless the employee was otherwise scheduled and expected to work during the holiday.
(4) If an employee normally would be required to work overtime, but is unable to do so because of a CFRA-qualifying reason that limits the employee's ability to work overtime, the hours that the employee would have been required to work may be counted against the employee's CFRA entitlement. In such a case, the employee is using intermittent or reduced schedule leave. For example, if an employee normally would be required to work 48 hours in a particular week, but due to a serious health condition the employee works 40 hours that week, the employee would utilize eight hours of CFRA-protected leave out of the 48-hour workweek. Voluntary overtime hours that an employee does not work due to a serious health condition shall not be counted against the employee's CFRA leave entitlement.
(5) If an employer has made a permanent or long-term change in the employee's schedule (for reasons other than CFRA, and prior to the employee notice of need for CFRA leave), the hours worked under the new schedule are to be used for making this calculation.
(d) Minimum duration for CFRA leaves taken intermittently or on a reduced leave schedule for the birth, adoption, or foster care placement of a child: CFRA leave taken for reason of the birth, adoption, or foster care placement of a child of the employee does not have to be taken in one continuous period of time. Any leave(s) taken shall be concluded within one year of the birth or placement of the child with the employee in connection with the adoption or foster care of the child by the employee. The basic minimum duration of the leave shall be two weeks. However, an employer shall grant a request for a CFRA leave of less than two weeks' duration on any two occasions and may grant requests for additional occasions of leave lasting less than two weeks.
(e) Minimum duration for CFRA leaves taken intermittently or on a reduced leave schedule for the serious health condition of a parent, child, or spouse or for the serious health condition of the employee: Where CFRA leave is taken for a serious health condition of the employee's child, parent, or spouse or of the employee, leave may be taken intermittently or on a reduced work schedule when medically necessary, as determined by the health care provider of the person with the serious health condition. However, intermittent or reduced work schedule leave may be taken for absences where the employee or family member is incapacitated or unable to perform the essential functions of the position because of a chronic serious health condition, even if he or she does not receive treatment by a health care provider. An employer must limit leave increments to the shortest period of time that the employer's payroll system uses to account for absences or use of leave provided it is not greater than one hour.
(1) If an employee needs intermittent leave or leave on a reduced work schedule that is foreseeable based on planned medical treatment for the employee or a family member, or if the employer agrees to permit intermittent or reduced schedule leave for the birth of a child or for placement of a child for adoption or foster care, the employer may require the employee to transfer temporarily to an available alternative position. This alternative position must have the equivalent rate of pay and benefits, the employee must be qualified for the position, and it must better accommodate recurring periods of leave than the employee's regular job. It need not have equivalent duties, although an employer may not transfer the employee to an alternative position to discourage the employee from taking leave or to otherwise work a hardship on the employee. Transfer to an alternative position may include altering an existing job to accommodate better the employee's need for intermittent leave or a reduced work schedule and must comply with any applicable collective bargaining agreement or employer leave policy, the FEHA, and any other applicable state or federal law.
(2) CFRA leave, including intermittent leave and/or reduced work schedules, is available to instructional employees of educational establishments and institutions under the same conditions as apply to all other eligible employees.
(3) Where it is physically impossible for an employee using intermittent leave or working a reduced leave schedule to commence or end work mid-way through a shift, such as where a flight attendant or a railroad conductor is scheduled to work aboard an airplane or train, or a laboratory employee is unable to enter or leave a sealed “clean room” during a certain period of time, the entire period that the employee is forced to be absent is designated as CFRA leave and counts against the employee's CFRA entitlement. However, an employee shall be permitted to return to work if he or she is able to perform other aspects of the work that are not physically impossible, such as administrative duties, and thereby shorten the time designated as CFRA leave.
(4) Employers may reduce exempt employees' pay for CFRA intermittent leave or a reduced work schedule, provided the reduction is not inconsistent with any applicable collective bargaining agreement or employer leave policy, the FEHA, and any other applicable state or federal law.
Note: Authority cited: Section 12935(a), Government Code. Reference: Section 12945.2, Government Code; DLSE Opinion Letter 03.12.2002; DLSE Opinion Letter 04.08.2002; Stats. 1993, ch. 827 (AB 1460), § 2; Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993, 29 U.S.C. § 2601 et seq.; and 29 C.F.R. § 825.
HISTORY
1. Change without regulatory effect renumbering former section 7297.3 to new section 11090 and amending section and Note filed 10-3-2013 pursuant to section 100, title 1, California Code of Regulations (Register 2013, No. 40).
2. Amendment of section and Note filed 3-4-2015; operative 7-1-2015 (Register 2015, No. 10).
3. Editorial correction of subsection (b) (Register 2015, No. 38).
This database is current through 10/5/18 Register 2018, No. 40
2 CCR § 11090, 2 CA ADC § 11090
End of Document© 2018 Thomson Reuters. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.