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§ 11089. Right to Reinstatement: Guarantee of Reinstatement; Rights upon Return; Refusal to Rei...

2 CA ADC § 11089BARCLAYS OFFICIAL CALIFORNIA CODE OF REGULATIONS

Barclays Official California Code of Regulations Currentness
Title 2. Administration
Division 4.1. Department of Fair Employment and Housing
Chapter 5. Fair Employment and Housing Council
Subchapter 2. Discrimination in Employment
Article 11. California Family Rights Act
2 CCR § 11089
§ 11089. Right to Reinstatement: Guarantee of Reinstatement; Rights upon Return; Refusal to Reinstate; Permissible Defenses.
(a) Guarantee of Reinstatement.
(1) Upon granting the CFRA leave, the employer shall inform the employee of its guarantee to reinstate the employee to the same or a comparable position, subject to the defenses permitted by section 11089(d), and shall provide the guarantee in writing upon request of the employee.
(2) It is an unlawful employment practice for an employer, after granting a requested CFRA leave, to refuse to reinstate the employee to the same or a comparable position at the end of the leave, unless the refusal is justified by the defenses stated in section 11089(d).
(A) An employee is entitled to reinstatement even if the employee has been replaced or his or her position has been restructured to accommodate the employee's absence.
(B) If an employee is no longer qualified for the position because of the employee's inability to attend a necessary course, renew a license, fly a minimum number of hours, or other non-qualifying reason, as a result of the leave, the employee shall be given a reasonable opportunity to fulfill those conditions upon returning to work.
(b) Rights upon Return.
The employee is entitled to the same position or to a comparable position that is equivalent (i.e., virtually identical) to the employee's former position in terms of pay, benefits, shift, schedule, geographic location, and working conditions, including privileges, perquisites, and status. The position must involve the same or substantially similar duties and responsibilities, which must entail substantially equivalent skill, effort, responsibility, and authority.
(1) Equivalent benefits include benefits resumed in the same manner and at the same levels as provided when the leave began, subject to any changes in benefit levels that may have taken place during the period of CFRA leave affecting the entire workforce, unless otherwise elected by the employee.
(2) CFRA does not prohibit an employer from accommodating an employee's request to be restored to a different shift, schedule, position, or geographic location that better suits the employee's personal needs on return from leave, from offering a promotion to a better position, or from complying with an employer's obligation to provide reasonable accommodation under the disability provisions of the Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA).
(c) Refusal to Reinstate.
(1) Definite Date of Reinstatement.
Where a definite date of reinstatement has been agreed upon at the beginning of the leave, a refusal to reinstate is established if the Department or employee proves, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the leave was granted by the employer and that the employer failed to reinstate the employee to the same or a comparable position by the date agreed upon.
(2) Change in Date of Reinstatement.
If the reinstatement date differs from the employer's and employee's original agreement, a refusal to reinstate is established if the Department or employee proves, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the employer failed to reinstate the employee to the same or a comparable position within two business days, where feasible, after the employee notifies the employer of his or her readiness to return.
(d) Permissible Defenses.
(1) Employment Would Have Ceased or Hours Would Have Been Reduced.
An employee has no greater right to reinstatement or to other benefits and conditions of employment than if the employee had been continuously employed during the CFRA leave period. An employer has the burden of proving, by a preponderance of the evidence, that an employee would not otherwise have been employed on the requested reinstatement date in order to deny reinstatement. As per (a)(1) of this section, this burden shall not be satisfied if the employee has been replaced or his or her position has been restructured to accommodate the employee's absence.
(A) If an employee is laid off during the course of taking CFRA leave and employment is terminated, the employer's responsibility to continue CFRA leave, maintain group health plan benefits and reinstate the employee ceases at the time the employee is laid off, provided the employer has no continuing obligations under a collective bargaining agreement or otherwise.
(B) If a shift has been eliminated or overtime has been decreased, an employee would not be entitled to return to work that shift or the original overtime hours upon reinstatement.
(2) “Key Employee.”
An employer may refuse to reinstate a “key employee,” as defined in section 11087(k) of these regulations, to his or her same position or to a comparable position only if the employer establishes, by a preponderance of the evidence, that all of the following conditions exist:
(A) The employee requesting the CFRA leave is a salaried employee. As used in Government Code section 12945.2 (r), “salaried employee” means an employee paid on a salary basis.
(B) The employee requesting the leave is among the highest paid 10 percent of the employer's employees who are employed within 75 miles of the worksite at which that employee is employed at the time of the leave request. Whether an employee is “among the highest paid 10 percent,” pursuant to Government Code section 12945.2, is determined by comparing the year-to-date wages, within the meaning of the California Labor Code and Industrial Welfare Commission Wage Orders, of the employer's employees within 75 miles of the worksite where the requesting employee is employed at the time of the leave request, divided by the number of weeks worked (including weeks in which paid leave was taken).
(C) The refusal to reinstate the employee is necessary because the employee's reinstatement will cause substantial and grievous economic injury to the operations of the employer. A precise test cannot be set for the level of hardship or injury to the employer which must be sustained. If the reinstatement of a key employee threatens the economic viability of the firm, that would constitute substantial and grievous economic injury. A lesser injury which causes substantial, long-term economic injury would also be sufficient. Minor inconveniences and costs that the employer would experience in the normal course of doing business would certainly not constitute substantial and grievous economic injury.
(D) An employer who believes it may deny reinstatement to a key employee must inform the employee in writing at the time the employee gives notice of the need for CFRA leave (or when CFRA leave commences, if earlier) that he or she is a key employee. At the same time, the employer must also inform the employee of the potential consequences with respect to reinstatement and maintenance of health benefits if the employer should determine that reinstatement will result in substantial and grievous economic injury to its operations. If the employer cannot give such notice immediately because of the need to determine whether the employee is a key employee, it shall give the notice as soon as practicable after the employee notifies the employer of a need for leave (or the commencement of leave, if earlier). An employer who fails to provide notice in compliance with this provision will lose its right to deny restoration even if substantial and grievous economic injury will result from reinstatement.
(E) As soon as an employer makes a good faith determination, based on the facts available, that substantial and grievous economic injury to its operations will result if it reinstates a key employee who has given notice of the need for CFRA leave (or who is on CFRA leave), the employer shall notify the employee in writing that it cannot deny CFRA leave, but that it intends to deny reinstatement on completion of the leave. An employer should ordinarily be able to give such notice prior to the employee starting leave. The employer must serve the notice either in person or by certified mail. The notice must explain the basis for the employer's finding that substantial and grievous economic injury will result, and, if leave has commenced, must provide the employee a reasonable time in which to return to work, taking into account the circumstances, such as the duration of the leave and the urgency of the need for the employee to return.
(F) If an employee on leave does not return to work in response to the employer's notification of intent to deny reinstatement, the employee continues to be entitled to maintenance of health benefits coverage as provided by section 11092(c) and the employer may not recover its cost of health benefit premiums. A key employee's rights under CFRA continue unless and until the employee either gives notice that he or she no longer wishes to return to work, or the employer actually denies reinstatement at the conclusion of the leave.
(G) After an employer notifies an employee that substantial and grievous economic injury will result if the employer reinstates the employee, the employee still is entitled to request reinstatement at the end of the leave period even if he or she did not return to work in response to the employer's notice. The employer must then again determine whether reinstatement will result in substantial and grievous economic injury, based on the facts at that time. If the employer determines that substantial and grievous economic injury will result, the employer shall notify the employee in writing (in person or by certified mail) of the denial of reinstatement.
(3) Fraudulently-obtained CFRA Leave.
An employee who fraudulently obtains or uses CFRA leave from an employer is not protected by CFRA's job restoration or maintenance of health benefits provisions. An employer has the burden of proving that the employee fraudulently obtained or used CFRA leave.
Note: Authority cited: Section 12935(a), Government Code. Reference: Section 12945.2, Government Code; Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993, 29 U.S.C. § 2601 et seq.; and 29 C.F.R. § 825.
HISTORY
1. Change without regulatory effect renumbering former section 7297.2 to new section 11089 and amending section and Note filed 10-3-2013 pursuant to section 100, title 1, California Code of Regulations (Register 2013, No. 40).
2. Amendment of section heading and section filed 3-4-2015; operative 7-1-2015 (Register 2015, No. 10).
This database is current through 11/30/18 Register 2018, No. 48
2 CCR § 11089, 2 CA ADC § 11089
End of Document© 2018 Thomson Reuters. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.