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Rule 609. Impeachment by Evidence of a Criminal Conviction

Arizona Revised Statutes AnnotatedRules of Evidence for Courts in the State of Arizona

Arizona Revised Statutes Annotated
Rules of Evidence for Courts in the State of Arizona (Refs & Annos)
Article VI. Witnesses (Refs & Annos)
Arizona Rules of Evidence, Rule 609
Rule 609. Impeachment by Evidence of a Criminal Conviction
(a) In General. The following rules apply to attacking a witness's character for truthfulness by evidence of a criminal conviction:
(1) for a crime that, in the convicting jurisdiction, was punishable by death or by imprisonment for more than one year, the evidence:
(A) must be admitted, subject to Rule 403, in a civil case or in a criminal case in which the witness is not a defendant; and
(B) must be admitted in a criminal case in which the witness is a defendant, if the probative value of the evidence outweighs its prejudicial effect to that defendant; and
(2) for any crime regardless of the punishment, the evidence must be admitted if the court can readily determine that establishing the elements of the crime required proving--or the witness's admitting--a dishonest act or false statement.
(b) Limit on Using the Evidence After 10 Years. This subsection (b) applies if more than 10 years have passed since the witness's conviction or release from confinement for it, whichever is later. Evidence of the conviction is admissible only if:
(1) its probative value, supported by specific facts and circumstances, substantially outweighs its prejudicial effect; and
(2) the proponent gives an adverse party reasonable written notice of the intent to use it so that the party has a fair opportunity to contest its use.
(c) Effect of a Pardon, Annulment, or Certificate of Rehabilitation. Evidence of a conviction is not admissible if:
(1) the conviction has been the subject of a pardon, annulment, certificate of rehabilitation, or other equivalent procedure based on a finding that the person has been rehabilitated, and the person has not been convicted of a later crime punishable by death or by imprisonment for more than one year; or
(2) the conviction has been the subject of a pardon, annulment, or other equivalent procedure based on a finding of innocence.
(d) Juvenile Adjudications. Evidence of a juvenile adjudication is admissible under this rule only if:
(1) it is offered in a criminal case;
(2) the adjudication was of a witness other than the defendant;
(3) an adult's conviction for that offense would be admissible to attack the adult's credibility; and
(4) admitting the evidence is necessary to fairly determine guilt or innocence.
(e) Pendency of an Appeal. A conviction that satisfies this rule is admissible even if an appeal is pending. Evidence of the pendency is also admissible.

Credits

Amended Oct. 19, 1988, effective Nov. 1, 1988; Sept. 8, 2011, effective Jan. 1, 2012.

Editors' Notes

COMMENT TO 2012 AMENDMENT
This rule has been amended to conform to Federal Rule of Evidence 609, including changing “credibility” to “character for truthfulness” in subsection (a), and adding language to the last clause of subdivision (a)(2) to clarify that this evidence must be admitted “if the court can readily determine that establishing the elements of the crime required proving--or the witness's admitting--a dishonest act or false statement.”
Additionally, the language of Rule 609 has been amended to conform to the federal restyling of the Evidence Rules to make them more easily understood and to make style and terminology consistent throughout the rules. These changes are intended to be stylistic only. There is no intent in the restyling to change any result in any ruling on evidence admissibility.
COMMENT TO ORIGINAL 1977 RULE
Subsection (d) is contrary to the provisions of A.R.S. § 8-207, but in criminal cases due process may require that the fact of a juvenile adjudication be admitted to show the existence of possible bias and prejudice. Davis v. Alaska, 415 U.S. 308, 94 S.Ct. 1105, 39 L.Ed.2d 347 (1974). The fact of a juvenile delinquency adjudication may not be used to impeach the general credibility of a witness. The admission of such evidence may be necessary to meet due process standards.
HISTORICAL NOTE
Source:
Federal Rules of Evidence, Rule 609.
Fed.Rules Civ.Proc., Rule 43(b), 28 U.S.C.A.
Code 1939, § 21-922.
Rule Civ.Proc., former Rule 43(g).
17A Pt. 1 A. R. S. Rules of Evid., Rule 609, AZ ST REV Rule 609
Current with amendments received through 05/1/2020.
End of Document© 2020 Thomson Reuters. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.